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can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its status in the world. >> reporter: the possible sanctions include freezing the overseas assets of russian individuals and companies, banning travel for russian leaders and businessmen and at the more extreme end, blocking some russian banks from the international financial system, an enormously costly situation for russ
. good morning, welcome to "squawk on the street," i'm carl quinnty naia, with jim cramer and david faber at the new york stock exchange. go, guys, unbelievable. >> i was shocked. a couple months. feels like a couple months. >> the story of my life these days, where does my time go these days? >> it's brilliant. >> big day setting up today, janet yellen is on the hill and a ton of retail earnings. the premarket, ten-year yield durables came in ahead of expectations and europe is dragging a bit some say as the war games on the russian/ukraine border look a little worrisome. the roadmap begins with retail, jcpenneys and best buy in rally mode as earnings top estimates despite flat to slowing sales. >> janet yellen is back on capitol hill this time testifying in front of the senate. this is an appearance that was postponed because of a snowstorm a couple of weeks ago, so any chance she's changed her outlook since then? >> and an electric expansion, tesla says it plans to invest $2 billion in a brand-new battery factory somewhere in the southwest within the next three years. the question is w
an act of aggression against ukraine. what's happening now and what does it all mean? nbc's jim maceda is in moscow. bill neely is in crimea. jim, we start with you in the russian capital there. what does that approval of putin's request to use russian troops mean? >> reporter: hi, craig. you're right. it is pretty symbolic. the legislative body that putin requested that use of force from is a rubber stamp, upper house of parliament. and it doesn't mean that putin will now send in more troops into crimea. there are thousands there already all part of russia's black sea fleet. large numbers have been seen there over the past 48 hours, securing airports, government buildings, telecom towers. what the approval does mean is it's official now. russians have been mobilized in crimea. they can now all put their patches back on. and the approval of course gives putin more options. it allows him to strike not only crimea but anywhere in ukraine. and of course that spikes the tension even higher. >> jim, any word at this point on a timetable? >> reporter: not that we're aware of, no. but i can t
indicates the degree to which russia is on the wrong side of history in this. >> jim maceda joins us now from moscow. jim, we've been talking about this, do you see this as a pull back and a lowering of tensions herely vladmy putin or is it just coincidence? >> hi, julia. it's not questions dense. it wasn't coincidence when they games were called five or on six days ago to take place along the russian/ukrainian border and it's not questiocoincidence tha they're ending today. vladimir putin could just as well have changed, for whatever reason, changed tend date. if this does happen, keep in mind, it was ordered that we haven't seen any indication of a pullback. the -- certainly if these war games do come to an end, it's going to mean that that massive show of force, we're talking about 150,000 troops, 900 tanks, 200 warships and airplanes. i mean, this should really bring the temperature down just in the seeing of and the doing of that kind of pullback. so russia has built up a fourth -- on crimea and division 5, 15,000, 16,000. it has complete operational control of crimea and it's still
by the 1997 base agreement, and de-escalate rather than expand their invasion. >> nbc's jim maceda is in moscow. jim, putin said in his speech yesterday that he didn't have troops in the crimea. he also acknowledge the idea, perhaps, of a further dialogue. so what is the situation here? and do you believe in a diplomatic solution given what putin was saying yesterday? >> good morning, julia. what a difference a day makes. based on putin's comments, many would say that they're taking them with a grain of salt. but he did say tuesday that he saw no need for the use of force in ukraine, he had no desire to an ex the crimean peninsula. that has allowed in people's perception for a stepping back from the brink. this cold war style military confrontation seems to be yesterday's news. and even though crimea remains tense today on the ground, there have been more exchanges of fire, there's been an approach by the russians to take over a ukrainian post again. still, even though these forces are locked in a standoff, it now appears as if ukraine is spinning not towards war, but some kind of
cost benefit analysis, ukraine is hugely important to russia. and i want to maintain high jim any over it. and these incidental sanctions can i weather them and in due course the united states and europe will back off them because they don't have staying power. i will get what they want and they won't hurt me that much. that's their calculus. what's our calculus? >> ambassador, thank you, sir. enjoy london. >> thank you. >> and general bob scales insists russian president putin is bluffing that u.s. intervention must be on the table. i will tell you most people have military fatigue and you put it on the table. >> well, first of all understand russian military forces are very weak. they don't have a draft army. not a single stealth fighter. their navy can't get out of ports. it it really is the gang that couldn't shoot straight. we have still a very strong military. we ought to leverage that asymmetry. is that a threat or actually a follow-through? there are two things there. one is a threat to sort of scare them because they have a pathetic military and the other one is to actually co
$1 billion in loan guarantees to ukraine. i'm going to turn to senior white house correspondent jim acosta. so, jim, you have both the secretary of state and president obama expressing a lot of support for ukraine today and the administration seemed to offer president putin perhaps a way out of this crisis. >> that's right, brianna. i think that's what the president and the administration has been saying all along through this, that there are these off-ramps for vladimir putin if he wants to bring in international observers to deal with some of these questions that he has about the safety of ethnic russians, which by the way the administration rejects, then bring in international observers. i will tell you we just came out of what was supposed to be a budget briefing and as you know the president was making those remarks earlier at a budget event. it just shows you how much ukraine and the events are dominating everything right now. i had a chance to ask white house press secretary jay carney about vladimir putin's claim that those are not russian troops in crimea and jay carney sai
to watch. here is jim douglas from our affiliate faa. >> she stood tremling bz a guard led a man in and she wheel and for the first time faced the man who haunts her. >> can you hear me? can you hear me? look at this face. look at him. >> richardson looked and looked away. this is what he saw. this is what he heard. >> look at him. this is his daily life. look at him. just look at him! stare at him now! look at him. stare at him! >> stewart richardson said he wanted to tell the family he was sorry and he 3r5is for him. five years of suffering and rage erupted. >> my son is dying every single day. every single day he is suffering. he can't see. he can't talk. he can't breathe. he can't eat. he can't do anything. he is in pain every single day. every single day. >> richardson remains in tarrant county jail while a court decides whether they can enhance his punishment using prior arrests in four other states to keep him off the streets for life. instead of a mandatory evacuation mum a maximum. >> i'm sorry to hear it. >> i don't care about your sorry. you make me more angry when you say sorry.
and supervisor chiu will be joining us now. and i also want to thank sfgtv jim smith and jonathan. madam clerk, do we have any announcements? city clerk: please silence all cell phones and electronic devices and please include in the copies into the file to the clerk. >>supervisor london breed: thank you madam clerk please call the first item. city clerk: agenda[hearing - implementation of audit recommendations status]1310431.sponsor: cohenhearing on the update by the city services auditor on the status of implementation sf 11234 >> good morning supervisors. my name is tonya, i'm the director of city audit of the controllers office and with me is cat skog an. we are going to talk about our follow up process for audit and memorandum issue. the benefit from audit work is not only in the findings or recommendations made but in the implementation of those recommendations. by conducting audit follow up ensures our department to enhance change and city agencies and city management and assess the value of our work. our office does two kinds of follow up work. regular and field follow up. our regular
loyalty is to the work of art, and she is encouraged to work with the officer named jim who is the curator of the museum and goes on to be the director after the war and they do this dance over a period of about six months of what i really referred to as kind of a dance of courtship not in the romantic sense, that trying to see if he can be trusted with this information. and there are two people of destiny each holding path of the same key. rose is determined to find every single thing taken from her country and she persists with this until 1981 when she dies and never gives up on it. it becomes a pain in the side to the people in france but want the subject to go away but she is a woman in a man's world. she had no transportation. and on the other hand, jim wants to fulfill his destiny and do something great and realizes he can play a role in the work of art recovered in france but he has transportation hub as part of the second lieutenant in the army that he doesn't know where to go. so, this is the dynamic between the two of them back and forth. her testing to see can you be trusted, wi
more widespread outages by the end of the day. jim cantore has the latest for us from washington, d.c. >> reporter: how about this, winter's just cranking it out here. we've seen our temperature go from 37 degrees down to 17 degrees, so we've dropped 20 degrees since midnight. 20 degrees. of course, if you think about what happened to the roads yesterday around 50, now we refreeze them and you have a solid cake sitting on these road surfaces. cars are moving, because it's pretty flat, but once you start getting on a hill or two, in and around washington and baltimore, it gets ugly. i'll tell you, if we can get this stuff up by about 2:00 this afternoon once this precipitation begins to taper off, we're going to make headway on the roads. tonight again, single digit temperatures. the normal high for the day is 51 degrees in washington. the normal low is 34. we will start tomorrow at 9 and maybe, maybe get to 31 for a high. we won't even touch our normal low temperature tomorrow, so very, very cold there with whatever's melted underneath is going to cause problems. so far looks like w
things or looking that way now is that often consumers have no way of knowing if jim as are interfering not because there's no way beyond genetically modified ingredients. and this is one tiny solution we can take to get the consumer says the average consumers the information they need to empower them to make the choices that they need for their diets. now though there's been no studies on india mullahs and their safety for chronically ill people do you believe that they're safe for people from elements as well. i can speak from experience and that is hearing from people who are chronically ill to get cia mossad of their diet they see an improved quality of life i think at that rate there is anecdotal but it's people's real life experience as an add something to take into consideration when looking at it and looking at opportunities for this research. tell me at odd hours of this study that ruling came by to say to you as celiac disease. the state that further testing is to be done and we were talking about this what kinds of hats and specific. do we need while we did some independent r
in the ukraine may put more of a strain on the u.s. and russian relations. jim sciutto is joining us with that side of the story. so, in your mind, does the u.s. have any more plans other than just talking loudly at this point? >> well, that's a good question. in those words, there's a lot of meaning. officials delivering very stark warnings to the russians to be careful not to move in. you heard secretary of state john kerry saying yesterday it would be, in his words, a grave mistake in the russians move in. now you have defense secretary chuck hagel who is traveling saying that russia should not make any moves that could easily be misinterpreted. we know they are watching closely. i think we can assume that they are working very much behind the scenes to deliver that message as well. and that shows that they are concerned. what else can they do beyond those concerns, it's a fair question. we don't know. it's hard to say what else they can do. >> what is the biggest concern? >> the biggest concern is that russia moves in. we've seen this story before. you remember in 2008 when russi
. >> nbc chief pentagon correspondent jim mcicklaszewsk is following the crisis. >> u.s. military officials at the pentagon continue to stress there are no viable options, no viable military solutions to this russian/ukrainian crisis. officials continue to stress that they have issued no orders to scramble any military assets, no ships, no planes, no military forces have been put on stand-by. the question is, if you did that, then what would they do? and the big fear is that it could lead to some unintended confrontation with the russian military forces that nobody here wants. instead, they're going to take some small steps. they're talking about suspending or canceling a joint u.s./russian military exercise set for may and cutting off for the time being all military to military consultations and contacts with the russians. you know, the feeling is that the only viable weapons now in the u.s. arsenal are diplomatic and economic sanctions, which the white house has been talking about for some time now. and if there's any piece of good news in any of this, u.s. military says intelligence indi
scrambling to fight snowy roads that. means diggy deep. jim axed rod takes us under lake seer to see winter. >> to find people happy with the condition of the roads this winter. you've got go 1800 feed in cleveland. to the cargo corp rarks salt minus. there you'll find 100 or so mine workers like p.j. king who thinks all the ice and snow is a good thing. >> absolutely a good thinging. >> a little more money in the pocket? >> absolutely. >> so a bad winter a bov ground is nods as bad. >> absolutely. >> john gruber is the mine's sunt. >>> what changes when the winter is zreechl? >> the hours. the hours worked are the biggest change. >> for demand spike, cargill is producings 15,000 to 16,000 tons of salt a day. blasting, load, hauling, dumping, and processing 16,000 tons of salt a day. and it all comes through here. >> pretty much a steady stream like that around the clock. >> reporter: steve horn is in charge of the entire operation here. 15,000 to 16,000 tons of sault a day. sounds like a lot of salt. >> reporter: is it enough to meet the demand? >> we're keeping up. we've seen our inventor
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
a range of options, jim, including loan guarantees to support ukraine economically. the next step is for the new government to resume talks with the imf, and as the government engages imf, we will take steps in ordination with multilateral and bilateral partners, as well as the new government. >> in the latest disclosure based on the leaks of edward snowden, "the guardian" reports britain's spy agency gchq intercepted millions of people's webcam chats and stored still images of them. the surveillance program, codenamed optic nerve, saved one image every five minutes from randomly selected yahoo webcam chats and stored them on agency databases. gchq collected images from the webcam chats of more than 1.8 million users globally in a six-month period in 2008 alone. many of the images were sexually explicit. more after headlines. were iraq, 51 people planted on aa bomb minibus killed five civilians. over 1005 hundred 60 people have been killed so far this year in iraq, with 680 killed since the beginning of february. israeli forces opened fire and killed a palestinian man thursday aft
, the longview. we need to take a long view here. the panel will include four experts including jim dobbins' predecessor. it will be moderated by andrew wilder who heads the center for south and central asia here at the u.s. institute of peace. the second panel will be on the future of media in afghanistan. again, four distinguished david as chaired by moderator from voices of america. we hope that you can conclude from today's program that afghanistan still matters to the united states. america's national security therest are best served by emergence of a stable and prosperous afghanistan. this objective can still be and what has been accomplished in afghanistan over the last decade offers some grounds for optimism that we can achieve this objective. afghanistan has made great progress over the last 12 years in health, education, women's rights and economic development. you will hear about that today in these remarks. you will also hear about the political progress that the afghan people have made. a presidential election is scheduled for this coming april 5. for the first time, there is t
correspondent jim sciutto. there's so many policies and cultures. it seems far away but it isn't. >> ukraine is in europe, kiev is miles away from rome, paris, london, that kind of thing and we have u.s. allies just to the west, poland, slovakia, hungary, romania. the u.s. is required to defend these countries militarily if they come under threat. >> crimea, appropriately colored red. why? >> because it has that pull toward russia. russia, right on the tip of russia, it's the headquarters of their black sea fleet, their on warm water port, all of the ports up here are cold, they don't have access to them in the winter. this is key. it's key when those thousands of russian troops moved into crimea, it where they went. >> people will remember this place throughout history. you had famous things happening here as part of its separation, we were talking earlier, florence nightingale. >> that's right, long ties between this part of the world and seems a million miles away in europe. >> the charge of the light brigade back in the 1850s. this went against the wrong front there and it proved very co
up by 171 points above fair value, gaining back the ground that was lost yesterday and then some. jim cramer is warning -- he's just warning be cautious on this. you shouldn't have sold on yesterday's big news and you shouldn't be buying today. >> okay. let's take a look at stocks to watch. if you do, maybe you want to buy something. radio shack posted a larger than expected fourth quarter loss. revenues fell short of analysts estimates. they saw a 19% drop in same-store sales and announced plans to close about 1,100 underperforming u.s. stores. >> remember those ads in the super bowl? the radio shack ads that was we're getting rid of the radio shack of the '80s. >> it's pretty cool. you go into a radio shack these days. >> 1,100 stores to close. >> i've seen some cool stores. the new ones are impressive. i want to just say -- >> wonder how many have had the new makeover? >> i've only seen one. i thought it was pretty cool. >>> auto parts retailer autozone reported profit of $5.63 a share, beating estimates by 7 cents. same-store sales in this case were up 4.3%. auto zone says the sev
augustine is the new veteran director. nice to have you back. marine corps veteran jim marszalek now serves as dav national service director and his fellow marine corps veteran, barry janowski leads as executor of her in cold springs, kentucky. good to have you back, too. and with us today is ms. susan miller was elected to the office of national commander of the dav auxiliary. ms. miller previously served as registered nurse with the veterans health administration, and i note that ms. miller's son, trent, is a member of the united states army, recently serving in his second deployment to afghanistan. gentlemen and ms. miller, thank you for your leadership and for your service. i look forward to working with each of you in your new roles, continue to work with those of you that are continuing and the roles that you've had for a number of years but i would also like to recognize the dav members from my home state of florida who may be with us today but if you could just raise your hand out so we can say hello. isn't this just like home? this is just like him. [laughter] welcome to those from
you on the markets. >> diving straight into derivatives with the options insight. jim stuber joins me in studio for his insight into the options world. the options market in the red after tensions rise between the ukraine and russia. how are you seeing this layout? >> this is on the other side of escalation. we did not see significant hedging activity. the real action happening in etfs like rfx. the largest trade is an opening seller of 21 strike put. they are expressing the view that there is limited downside. they will get long in the stock about 10% lower. they are pocketing $2 million in premium to express that view. we are estimating that seeing that similar in the options market. not going to escalate significantly. >> we did see the biggest selloff in five years and russian equities today. >> that is where the options market is now. whether it is complacency or not, we will see. we will look at six options as well. the most actively traded blind is in march 16 strike calls and the closing seller. you do not see significant long. they are taking advantage of a lift in volatility
." we're joined by jim from moscow. it may not be a zero sum game as far as kerry is concerned but it is as far as vladimir putin's concerned, isn't it? he's been incredibly silent over the last two weeks. what's going on with him here? >> reporter: that's right. what happens next will obviously be very much dependent on what vladimir putin does next, and so far we simply haven't heard from the guy. he had a meeting yesterday with his top security council but no information came out of that and i think that this is really what's driving the uncertainty about what russia does next, because putin, after all, must be reeling from the loss of face, if nothing else, from this revolution in ukraine especially given the timing of it, right at the height of putin's olympic glory, and we still don't know what he's planning. perhaps he's waiting to see what the makeup is of the new government in kiev, before he plays his hand. in any case, julia, the overall sense we're getting from experts we're talking to here in moscow is that putin would only use intervention or even encourage a spli
through congress. republican congressman jim gerlach, for example, sponsored a bill that would create a new path for congress to challenge the president in u.s. district court for, quote, potentially unconstitutional actions. >> i believe it is time for the congress to put in place for a proper of fast track, independent review of those executive actions. >> reporter: democrats on the house judiciary committee saying the president should have flexibility to implement complex programs and challenged the purpose of today's hearing. >> yet, another attempt by the majority to prevent the president's implementation of duly-enacted legislative initiatives that they oppose, such as the affordable care act. >> reporter: but house judiciary committee chairman, republican congressman bob goodlatte contend that the president does not have the constitutional authority, quote, to bypass congress based on his policy prevalences. on the hill today, a a florida orthodontist met with members of congress. he is suing the treasury secretary and irs over the president's decision to delay the obamacare em
to do with the 1990's when she was allied to prime minister who was jim prisoned in the u.s. for about six years and was released a couple of years ago. the allegations are not something new. they've been around for a long time. allegation of corruption are pervasive throughout ukraine's political class. this is not something that she fears. >> this is nothing new. >> no, it's not new. the boxer made money from sports. >> sure, he was a boxer. >> all of the other political forces in one way or another have drown in corruption, all political parties in ukraine don't get money from membershipp dues. they get it from money in offshore zones. that lack of transparency within the political system has been there for a long time. there's a need to separate and break bonds between business and politics and there's certainly a need to fight corruption. no ukrainian leader, none of the four presidents of ukraine have ever had the political will to fight corruption and hencey ukraine is described by transparency international the n.g.o. watchdog on corruption as the most corrupt country in europe
-americans and they were having a great deal of variety. but it was really emblematic of racial segregation and jim crow and economic injustice and it had come boiling over the top. so it wasn't a people have gotten too much access, but that they had too little and it becomes a result of that. and so when we think about terms like burn baby burn and all these are prices that could be used as this, that becomes part of the debate and the idea of the new right in modern-day conservatism because it becomes a symbol of what people are saying as part of this and liberalism just haven't gone far not. so the activists are an example of the language of the unheard and very interesting in terms of this depending on your viewpoint. it really gives us a perspective of what you think of the 60s and the aspirations for american societies. as an example of excess or people were so oppressed and had so much social misery that the only way that they could respond a century of this kind of segregation and brutalities with that kind of violence. >> host: a reminder that you can send us a tweet apple tv or send us a quest
segregation and jim crow and economic injustice, the racial oppression had come boy yelling over th the tops of it wasn't tt people have gotten too much access and have become angry and belligerent comment that they had too little. for the civil rights when we think about terms like burn baby boom and the leverage for the political transformation that becomes a part of the debate but also when we think about the idea of the new right and barry goldwater and modern-day conservatism he becomes a symbol of what people are saying is liberalism access and so for the black power activists liberalism hasn't gone far enough. he says it is an example of the language of the unheard. so it's interesting. depending on your viewpoint it gives a perspective of what do you think about the social movement and the aspirations and society. is he an example of excess or that people were so oppressed the only way they can respond after a century of this kind of segregation and brutality is that kind of violence. >> host: if you can't get through on the phone lines you can send a message at booktv send a questio
-raising operation. we'll have more on what organizing for action chief jim
because they're the real deal. >> what has happened to syracuse? >> this has not been jim boeheim's best offensive or defensive team. but for the first 25 games, they operated at an incredibly high level of efficiency. they made plays at a level far above the way they normally played. their numbers aren't that different from last year. last year at the end of the season, georgetown blew them out. they lost games toward the end of the season, they couldn't score. georgetown held them to 35 points in washington, d.c. people were thinking it's over for syracuse. look at the final four. will that happen this year? i don't know. they have jeremy grant out, he's got a back issue, has not played much lately. trevor coony, their terrific shooter, has not been able to find shots. they're not a great offensive team. they're still dangerous but they have to get their mojo back a bit. >> you talked about one of my alma maters, florida gators. they're really good. >> billy donovan is a hall of fame coach. he's not a good coach, he's a great coach. they lost a lot from last year, they've gone to the e
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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